Phone: (480) 889-1573

              Fax: (480) 889-1574

(Se Habla Español)


Can Arrhythmia Increase Risk of Stroke?

Can Arrhythmia Increase Stroke Risk Mesa AZ

Cardiac arrhythmia, a condition characterized by an abnormal heartbeat, has been linked to strokes and other health problems. The incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF), which is a type of arrhythmia, has in fact been found in a significant number of elderly stroke victims. Those who suspect such heart problems should consider seeking help from our arrhythmia treatment center in Arizona.

Understanding the Heart

A human heart normally beats from 60 to 80 times a minute and in a constant rhythm, no matter the rate. The pumping process is controlled by electrical impulses emanating from the heart's natural pacemaker, medically known as the sinus node. An arrhythmia may cause the heart to beat too rapidly or too slowly. The condition marked by an excessively rapid heartbeat is known as tachycardia.

Identifying Atrial Fibrillation

This type of tachycardia involves disorganized electrical activity and results in excessive contractions in the upper chambers of the heart, which in turn disrupt its ability to pump properly. Though not automatically a life-threatening condition, this rapid beating of the heart can produce palpitations or "light-headed" sensations. If the condition persists, it can produce a blood clot that can travel to the brain, leading to a stroke.

Seeking Medical Attention

According to one medical review, arrhythmias in general can more than double the risk of a "silent" stroke. This condition can affect thinking and memory without having any other noticeable symptoms.

Recent research has also shown that AF can itself increase by 40 percent the risk of dementia. The seriousness of this condition should be enough for suspected sufferers to seek heart arrhythmia treatment in Mesa, Arizona at our cardiology clinic.

Schedule Your Consultation Today

Contact CAIAZ to schedule an appointment. We have a central schedule number for all our offices in Arizona. Call us at (480) 889-1573 to schedule your appointment today!